Marisa Lobo: When fundamentalism becomes a straitjacket at the service of a conservative political agenda

 

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By Hermes C. Fernandes


Think of a cultured woman, a writer, well-articulated, trained, and post-graduated in an important branch of the humanities,  but whose discourse totally disagrees with the social movements that promote human rights and women’s empowerment. Is this possible? Yes, how? What ingredient added to those I have listed above could transform a potential feminist and human rights activist into someone of anachronistic stance, doing a disservice to the social causes that she should defend? The evidence seems to point to religious fundamentalism.

For those who haven’t connected the dots yet, I’m talking about the controversial psychologist Marisa Lobo.

If his performance was restricted to the religious space, it might not cause so much fuss. But by the way, Marisa has less modest ambitions. Taking advantage of the projection she had when having her professional record revoked accused of mixing her belief with her clinical practice, the Christian psychologist has been an easy figure moving through the corridors of power, as well as in political or religious events, always flanked by equally controversial figures and prominent. Pastor Silas Malafaia, deputy Marco Feliciano and Senator Magno Malta are among the guarantors of his public image.

He used social media extensively to help promote the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff, joining with his mentors. And of course, he celebrated the fall of the president and the rise of Michel Temer.

At no time did he touch criticism for the fact that there are no women among the ministers chosen by the interim president. But she was one of the promoters of the campaign raised by Malafaia’s wife in support of the new first lady (Bela, demure, and home).

In a comment made by journalist Noblat on his profile on the twitter, although there are no women or blacks in charge of the ministries, there would be at least two homosexuals, so LGBT activists should be satisfied. So far, the psychologist who advocates “gay healing” has not manifested itself. The fact is that, when it is politically convenient, both she and her gurus turn a blind eye to anything they disagree with. Does she blindly believe that the two gay ministers of the Temer government could be cured? Would an exorcism session solve it? Or would it be better to let it go in the name of common interests?

I don’t particularly believe in gay healing. I believe that homosexuals, everyone, without exception, needs healing. But not to cure your homosexuality. They need to be healed from the wounds opened by our hypocrisy and prejudice. I don’t think Marisa should agree with me.

For her and so many others who do a fundamentalist reading of the Scriptures, what gays need is to abandon their perverse and abominable practice, whether through therapy, or through exorcism, or even penance.

Recently, Marisa Lobo posed with her new book “The ideology of Gender in Education” alongside the newly appointed Minister of Health Ricardo Barros. She wrote on her Facebook page: “I took the opportunity to alert you about the imposition of gender ideology in education and how this child indoctrination can generate psychological disorders in children such as Gender dysphoria, among others.” According to the psychologist, “gender ideology is also a health issue, # SaúdeMental.” Also according to his report: “He was extremely friendly, attentive and answered me in that way.” This is over. The MEC is now from the DEM “that is, it filled me with hopes, that our children will really deserve care from the ministry of education and Health that is now his ministry “(sic).

It is unfortunate to know that a years-long struggle to combat intolerance and prejudice in the school environment could suffer a setback due to the religious lobby.

In the community I pasture, a boy of just 11 years old, a colleague of some of our children, committed suicide by taking pellets and choking himself with a plastic bag, for not enduring the bullying suffered at school due to his sexual orientation. Sad to know, this is just one of the countless cases. However, religious fundamentalism is so blind that, in addition to making the soul-sick, it starts the conscience, depriving us of both a critical sense and compassion and empathy.

What psychologist Marisa Lobo mistakenly calls “gender ideology”, is nothing more than a sensible attempt to combat prejudice within the classroom. And it is not limited to gender bias, but also ethnic, religious, and even what victimizes the physically and mentally disabled.

There is a lack of mercy in the religious discourse of those who present themselves as followers of Jesus. Perhaps they forget that, in the words of St. James, “the judgment will be without mercy for those who do not use mercy.”

For the psychologist and her class, the government would be encouraging pedophilia and homosexuality through booklets distributed in schools. The aim would be to destroy Judeo-Christian values ​​along with the traditional family model. There would be a communist conspiracy in the Gramscista style, to deconstruct any and all social structures, starting with the family, thus setting the stage for the installation of a totalitarian world government. What she may not know, or pretend not to know, is that policy for diversity has been adopted in the most developed countries in the world (most traditionally Christian), starting with the USA, the largest capitalist nation on the planet. On the other hand, it is not adopted in socialist countries like Cuba and China, much less by Russia (which according to some, will resurface as a great communist power). You will understand …

Undoubtedly, the countries in which diversity is most hard-fought are theocratic, where the fundamentalist view of Islam prevails.

If the evangelical group continues in its aggressive lobbying the current government, we run the risk of seeing a kind of gospel Taliban implanted in the country.

There is an urgent need to reaffirm and redouble the vigilance over the secularity of the Brazilian state. To paraphrase the Protestant reformer Martin Luther, God acts in the world through two arms, that of Law (state) and that of Grace (church). The problem is when the arms decide to cross. Both are paralyzed as if they are trapped in a straight jacket. The challenge, therefore, is to maintain each power in its sphere. Religion has its importance. Even the most skeptical will agree. But it is not authorized to extrapolate its sphere and impose its dogmas and doctrines on society as a whole.

Behind the pulpit of the church I pastor, I am not a psychologist. I can even quote Freud, Jung, and so many others. But I cannot transform the service into a therapeutic session. Similarly, in the office, the pastor must give way to the therapist. There is no place for religious discourse. The same applies to the field of politics. In the plenary there are no pastors, no priests, no pais-de-Santo, but only representatives of the people. As in the pulpit, there should be no candidates looking for votes, nor politicians looking for support for their agendas. If we keep each activity in its own sphere, social progress will be consolidated without religious interference, and religion, whatever it may be, will have guaranteed its right to worship and publicize its beliefs and values.